Programme Information

How long does it last?

The full programme is two years of part time study.

How do I participate

We offer two types of learning opportunity

  1. a face to face version of the programme
  2. an online version of the programme

We’ll make information about these learning opportunities available when we have scheduled a programme delivery.  An application page will appear on the website at such times.  When a programm is not scheduled an ‘Advanced Applications Page’ may be available for those wanting to secure a place on the next round of training.

What qualification do I get?

At the end of two years, successful students will have two qualifications.  These are:

  1. Level 4 Diploma in Deafblindness for Practitioners
    • worth 60 credits – this is the equivalent of
      • Level C on the Higher Education Framework that applies to England, Northern Ireland and Wales
      • Level 7 on the Scottish Credit and Qualifications Framework.
  2. Level 5 Diploma in Deafblindness for Advanced Practitioners
    • worth 60 credits – this is the equivalent of
      • Level I on the Higher Education Framework that applies to England, Northern Ireland and Wales
      • Level 8 on the Scottish Credit and Qualifications Framework.
The Qualifications are awarded by (***information will follow***).

What’s the time commitment?

Each credit is worth an average of 10 hours of study per student – some more, some less depending on the level of expertise and past research / reading that the student brings to the programme.  So each 60 credit year is worth about 600 hours of study.  That time is comprised of attendance at training days (face to face delivery only, there are no training days associated with the online version of the programme), carrying out tasks that are defined in the programme manuals that accompany each unit, personal research and assignment writing.  By way of comparison a full time academic year – for example each year of a full time degree – is worth 120 credits.

For the face to face delivery option there are compulsory attendance training days at the beginning of year one  and three at the beginning of year two.

What’s the content?

There are four units in each year.

In year one:

  1. Understanding Dual Sensory Impairment
  2. Understanding Communication in relation to Deafblindness
  3. Understanding Movement, Mobility and Orientation in relation to Deafblindness
  4. Understanding Public Policy in relation to Deafblindness

In year two there are four more units:

  1. Understanding Assessment and Support of Individuals with Dual Sensory Impairment
  2. Understanding Assessment and Support of Communication in relation to Deafblindness
  3. Understanding Assessment and Support of Movement, Mobility and Orientation in relation to Deafblindness
  4. Deafblindness: Independent Study Unit

As noted earlier – each unit is accompanied by a manual: a key text around each subject area.

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